A New Schema and Landscape for Programs

Dr Kaur and I sent a paper on a new schema and landscape for IEEE TEC peer review two weeks ago.

In the paper we showcase the new schema and landscape analyses by applying it to the Santa Fe ant problem. This caused us to discover for the first time the relationship between program structures and program fitness. Traditionally the Santa Fe ant problem is well known for presenting a random fitness relationship when analyzed by any other method.

We also show for the first time the systematic approaches to fitness improvement that programs make during genetic programming runs, thereby showing that the process is very different from what a random search does. We test a new variation and representation method that were designed based on our findings and obtained more efficient evolutionary search.

Please send me an email if you would like a copy for personal review.

We are currently undecided on whether we should post the pre-review paper to Arxiv.org. Any advice?

Making It To The Most Read Articles Lists in 2009

The Paper “Search, Neutral Evolution, and Mapping in Evolutionary Computing: A Case Study of Grammatical Evolution” Wilson, D.   Kaur, D.,  appeared in the July 2009 Top 10 Downloads of the IEEE Transactions on Evolutionary Computing ranked #1.

It also appeared (ranked #27) in the Top 100 Downloads of the entire IEEExplore site for July 2009!

Not bad!

Complete Genotype to Phenotype Tables and Maps Now Online

The Maps and complete Genotype to Phenotype tables for Hierarchical If-and-only-if, as well as the Cartesian Genetic Programming maps and tables are now posted as web-pages on this blog. Please click on the links above to access them. The complete tables were not included in the Neutral Evolution and Mapping paper because of space considerations.

For Your Viewing Pleasure

Below is the first of a series of lectures on Evolution, Ecology and Behavior by Professor Stearns of Yale University.

It has a lot of material that should be of interest to anyone interested in Evolutionary Computing. The fourth video in the series is on neutral evolution and genetic drift.

This series is going to make up a good portion of my holiday viewing.

A penny for your thoughts (literally)

A scan of the brain using fMRI
Image via Wikipedia

There are companies developing devices that can read your brain’s output and use it to control external devices. The technology used is similar to that used by an MRI scanner; as with an MRI scanner these technologies have the potential of providing a wealth of benefits for health care. An example application is their use to aid people with missing limbs control artificial replacement.

These devices are getting cheaper (in the $100 range). They are being used to allow  people to interact with games and other software applications. The easy and cheap availability of such brain scanning devices however raises some ethical questions. As this emotiv systems presentation shows, these devices can inadvertently read your mind. seeing what are your likes and dislikes.

Such data in the hands of a commision-based salesman is scary. It is easy to imagine a website that can assembles  text and  pictures on the fly (based on your preferences) to get you to buy whatever is being sold. Worse still they can sell your thoughts, such that other companies know how to target you better.

That is scary.

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Search, Neutral Evolution and Mapping in Evolutionary Computing:2

Here is a pre-proof copy of my accepted paper: “Search, Neutral Evolution and Mapping in Evolutionary Computing: A Case Study of Grammatical Evolution”.

I would encourage you to read section X  (Analysis of related works) , to see its true implications.

I plan to do a series of posts on what this paper means for Evolutionary Computing, and to post some of the MATLAB code used in this work.

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“This paper is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author’s copyright. In most cases, these works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder.”


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